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books every weekend on c-span2. from the fourth annual book festival, the triumph of the city featuring edward glaeser. his book is "the triumph of the city: how our greatest invention makes us richer, smarter, greener, healthier and happier." >> thank you for coming to the auditorium today. this is brought to you by wbur new station. thank you. thank you. i am sure some of you are saying, wow, that is bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller. i thought he was thinner. i thought he had more hair. [laughter] you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and think the book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific event? [applause] >> that is also part of the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this session and without their generosity, it would be hard to put on an event like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoyed in this great city. so thank you to them. [applause] in the way, that is what we are here to talk about this afternoon. the triumph of the cit
and the special jewels that are the urban villages we live in. i ran for office because i wanted to serve the city and protect all that is so special about san francisco. >> what lessons did you learn after campaigning for supervisor? >> san franciscans are incredibly interested in their city government, local politics, and making sure that we remain the most amazing city in the world. i learned that san franciscans during campaign read everything they are sent in the mail. they love to meet the candidates and engage in conversations with them. i learned how important it is to build bridges between different communities, particularly communities of diversity that we have. i was incredibly honored to have been elected in november of 2008. >> where do you place yourself on the political spectrum? >> i consider myself someone who shares the progressive values that many sentences can hold dear. we have been a beacon to the rest of the world region that many sentences skins hold dear. we have been a beacon to the rest of the world for those. >> you are president of the board. describe the role of the o
of the city, featuring edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wb, ur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? this. [laughter] i thought he was taller, i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair, and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a atlantic event? -- a terrific event? [applause] let's also thank the plymouth rock foundation for sponsoring this particular session and say that without their generosity, it would be hard to put on events like this that add to the cultural life that we all enjoy in this great city, so thanks to them. [applause] and in a way that's what we're here to talk about this afternoon, the triumph of this city and all the cities, the triumph of the cit
important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man:
. >>> to the continuing violence in the middle east, a bomb went off on a city bus in tel aviv. the bus was going past the military building when it exploded. there are reports that a man carried a package on the bus and it blew off after he got off the bus. coming up -- a report about all of the fighting. >>> back here at home, one of the suspects in a violent strings of crime in san jose will go in front of the judge for the first time. jonathan wilbanks is facing charges of murder, attempted murder and robbery. now, he and another man are accused of four robberies, a deadly attempted carjacking and a shooting that injured a police officer friday night. now, the two of them were caught on surveillance video at a 7/11 store where a man was shot and killed by the suspect. a $20,000 reward is being offered for information for the man who is still out there on the loose. >>> people in palo alto are being warned about two different scams involving energy and water services. the first one involves someone claiming to be from a gas company they claim a product they are selling lowers your bill. the city sa
this afternoon right over the top of the philadelphia to new york city area, that's where we could see minor accumulations. we're not talking a lot. the cities themselves, probably the roads will be fine, on the cars and the grass, maybe an inch or two. north and west of philadelphia, pennsylvania, northwest jersey could get from two to three inches. southern new england could pick up an inch or two and that could even accumulate on the roads. the airports could have minor issues as that falls from the sky. also down in the southeast, lynn, the other travel spot today, a lot of thunderstorms rolling through louisiana, mississippi and alabama. we'll track it all for you. i'll give you an update a little later. >> thanks so much. >>> a mystery in ramallah as the remains of former palestinian leader yasir arafat are exhumed. >>> plus, a photo of what could be the world's most infamous iceberg goes under the hammer. your headlines are straight ahead. you're watching "first look" on msnbc. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wa
in southern israel, but the city of ashkelon is not back to normal. just ask 3-year-old donna. it's hard to forget rocket sirens. she won't leave my side, her mother says. every little noise scares her. grandmother alana isn't celebrating this cease-fire either. eight days of suffering for nothing, she told us. on tv, the people of gaza say that they want. ashkelon is an easy target, nine miles from the gaza border. 65 rockets fired at this city were intercepted, but more than a dozen slipped through. one smashed the roof of the high school. classes were canceled because of the fighting, so no one was hurt. closer to the border, military units were packing up to leave. there are a lot of people in this country who believe it won't be long before they are back. israeli security forces say they have arrested the man behind the bomb blast here in tel aviv. they say he was a member of a group affiliated with hamas and islamic jihad, but they did not say that hamas ordered that attack. veronica? >> nbc's stephanie gosk in tel aviv. stephanie, thank you. >>> now for a look at the national weat
city areas where private property can help protect animals. >> we believe that ownership provides the best incentives for conservation. john: most of the buffalo are owned by private ranchers, but there are still some in state parks or one state park. one has a roundup. >> and they are actually treating their bison most like private ranchers are, making them pay. what they do is once a year for 45 years they have this huge round with a bring in their 1500 bison. tourists come from all over the world among pay money to watch these bison get heard it, and all wild west fashion with cowboys and cowgirls, and the bison come sweeping down the planes. the earth shakes. they did move in the corrals, and we all go eat bison murders after words. the point is, the park is making money from the tourism. then about a month later they auction off a portion to private ranchers and they're also making money now wait. all that money goes back into custer state park to pay for operations of the park. so they're paying their own way. john: more benefit from profit. coming of, how government made th
, turning into a tent city. we saw a year-and-a-half ago, the military in that country, get involved. we mentioned moments ago, that might be potentially the next step in all of this. talk to me about those people on the ground, right now. >> reporter: numbers smaller today than yesterday. but they are digging in. they set up tents and they say they are not going away. and, both sides are really calling out for numbers. a test of wills, right now, between the president and his supporters, and those who think he is trying to become a dictator. something people here have fought against a year ago and many are willing to fight against again. we have seen violence and now with tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands due out on the street in the days ahead we could see more violence here in the short-term, harris. >> harris: and people, digging in with the tents and spending the night in some cases, steve harrigan, thank you very much. we'll come back to you as the news warrants on this. egypt's road to democracy has been a shake one at best. you may recall it was january 25 of last
fighting in the area in the last four years. the gauzy city skyline has been peppered with shell attacks as residents flee. 10,000 residents have sought shelter in u.n.-run schools. that's after israel troops dropped leaflets warning them to evacuate. egypt's foreign minister announced the deal this morning with hamas and hillary clinton who arrived to help broker the truce. >> egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> earlier today, rockets were gaza struck a bus filled with people in the heart of tel aviv. at least 27 people were injured. while hamas did not take responsibility for the bombing, the mill lip tant group praised it -- the militant group praised it. >> translator: what happened in tel aviv was a heroic operation that gifted palestinian and gaza high. >> that comment came before the cease fire was announced. israel's prime minister agreed to the deal after a call from president obama. the president is offering to help israel strengthen its defense system and says he
>> mike >> this woman's body was found on the eastern portion of the city with a three- year old, this is one of 10 shootings between friday and early this morning also it claimed the life of a 19 year-old man. no suspects have been identified. a 15 year-old boy is in cut custody after this deadly crime spree. the teenager is being held on armed robbery in the attempted murder of a police officer in this man. 22 year-old rory pedeford first, alecia reed tells us how police apprehended the young murder suspect. >> following a police san jose and concord police going of the 15 year-old of the clayton creek apartment friday night. they surrounded the area. pulled him out and he surrendered peacefully. found the second suspect in shoot out in san jose. surrounded the area, called surrendered peacefully. >> he did not make the determination that he was wanted to take on the police parties. sometimes, in these>> last friday, the teenager job and will blank's robbed for businesses. and shot pettibofrt also a policeold w thingillbanks. tirelessly to find the second person responsible 20-
. they will debut in september 12th in san francisco. if it goes well it will expand to new york city and boston next year. they hope to generate $50 million in san francisco alone and recover in losses each year. >> yeah, they need to do that. we hear rumblings in amazon is doing same day delivery. you want to buy a book or dvd and it shows up at your house. time to privatize it nand those of you who leave the house today. maria is here with a check of the weather. >> good morning, everyone. we are lookingalt a nice day in the east coast it is it a beautiful couple of days in portions of the northeast and we are enjoying a lot of sunshine and temperatures that are mild for this time of year. high temperature at 54 degrees sunshine and heading southbound. wide spread high attaches in florida and upper 60s in the city of atlanta and we'll notice the changes in the east coast and that is thank to a strong front pushing in parts of the midmississippi valley and behind the system much colder and only 27 degrees. we are in the teen portions of the midwest bismarck 24 degrees. and if you head out to t
at the pentagon city mall at arlington, virginia. she joins us now. stacey, some 200 stores in this mall, four levels? what have you been seeing? >> it's enormous. if you want to shop this is the place to do it. some of the anchor stores, larger retailers opened at midnight. the store in general opened at 5:00 this morning. i just got some numbers on the parking lot which usually can tell you some idea of how many people are here. it's about 15% full. that is as of 5:00 a.m. keep in mind, that's 5:00 a.m. and we also have a metro station within walking distance of the mall. so many people come here that way. people are steady filing in. and, i just got this, which is i've not seen black fridays before, this is a shopper bag that they are providing, a shopper relief bag to shoppers out here. they've got some really neat items, bottled water. they have hand sanitizer. there are smacks in here, candy and ships and a lot of coupons for the stores. so that's on top of the black friday deals they're already offering. these are available as supplies last. made me feel good because i haven't been able
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any felony convictions. >>> the city of antioch is trying to entice officer ises to transfer from other agencies. they will consider amending their contract with the public system to come up with the formula that could have officers retouring earlier. right now the city has 14 vacant police officer positions to fill. >>> a controversy at a public school. certain things are offensive and should be beened. >> this black smoke could be seen from shore. this was a 80-foot yacht. >> waking up with cloud and fog -- clouds and fog this morning. we will have what you can expect for sunday, coming up. to deliver fresh fruit to offices in downtown san francisco. we built these wooden crates, filled these with fruit in my one-bedroom apartment. the fruit guys has been with bank of america since they first started. we work with them to help them grow and succeed. we're coming up on 50 employees and delivering to thousands of companies every week. i would definitely say this is a fruitful business. . >>> the coast guard rescued three people after their yacht caught fire off the coast of florid
in some cities. >>> finally, on the list of things that can go wrong on live television, what you're about to see, not too bad. but we had to marvel at the composure of our colleague, meteorologist eduardo rodriguez. one of our partner there is at univision. take a look at this, sammy. there's eduardo, doing the weather. and that is not a muppet. that's a cat that just walked right in. you can hear everybody in the studio, including his co-anchors, laughing hysterically at the cat, who decided to get a little air time. for some unfortunate parts. eduardo, as you can see, the picture of calm, as he talked about what looks like a real mild day. it's terrific. it was not going to leave. it was on. what do you think? >> i think he's a marvelously composed gentleman. why are there cats in the studio? >> that's a good question. follow-up-free. george? amy? >> let's go back to amy. >>> now, we're talking about the big concerns about the pork you're eating. a new study in "consumer reports" found pork chops and ground pork contaminated with bacteria that can make you sick. much of that bacteria re
, december 3, and that will focus on high speed and inner city passenger rail grant program. and then we'll have the final hearing on this important subject. thursday, the 13th of december, and that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically yesterday i was back in new york city actually looking at some of the flood and storm damage. many of the transportation infrastructure facilities were adversely impacted, huge amount of damage. they have incredible new york city is resilient, and how well they are coming back. i think they got about 95% of their transit operations, rail was particularly hit. almost all of east side lower manhattan tunnels flooded, and just think of the massive effort put forward to get those trains running. they probably move about 20% of all passengers in the world in new york city. and a hit like that was incredible. i understand mayor bloomberg, we met with yesterday, will be in town today, and we had discussions yesterday about fema, which our committee overseas -- oversees and also transportation and infrastructure that was hurt. that may be the subject of a
are seeing snow, even in new york city. all the big cities, boston, new york, philadelphia, a little snow. not much in the way of accumulation, really along the big cities and the 95 corridor, but still you'll see it come down. kind of get new the christmas spirit. we do have winter weather advisories and we will see accumulati accumulations. want to show you where. here's the radar. the white delynn naturing where the snow potentially is falling. some of it called zerba. starts as snow in the atmosphere but the atmosphere is dry but it dissipates so we don't see it at the surface. it does moisten the atmosphere to finally deliver some snow. this is the heart of it. scranton, pennsylvania, southeastern pennsylvania, northwestern new jersey, that's where we're going to get into the snow. morristown, new jersey, for example. but, with this line, a lot of energy with it, could see some severe weather. look at birmingham, down toward montgomery, all heading eastward, atlanta, georgia, will be slow go. no question this afternoon at the airport. things will really slow down. jackson all the way
this, beloved new york city. >> going to go to radio city, such fun for the kids, you guys have ever not gone, they give you 3-d glasses, see like 10,000 santas coming at you, the kids go crazy, probably try to go friday matinee. >> awesome, awesome. >> we had fun with anderson cooper, had fun the few days ago, like everyone is just hearing about our party. >> just aired yesterday. >> that's right. >> anderson cooper did something he has never, ever done on national television before. he had a couple of sips of the sauce, okay? and he is one lightweight. we have never seen anything like it except for when i was in high school. >> we thought he was kidding. no. >> anyway, this is how he did -- how it went down. >> so to speak. >> i'm so excited, hoda and kathie lee are here, having a lot of fun. i am drunk. it is sad but true. i'm like, during the break, i'm like eating chicken, like chicken. >> don't drink that much, do we? >> yes. >> okay. there's a new -- one of my favorite networks is tlc. >> favorite what? >> networks, tlc. >> tlc. >> tlc. oh, my god. >> yes. >> should never have
in the big cities and could even be mixed with some rain. again, that's tomorrow. today's dry in those areas. you're watching "morning joe." we're brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. it's cramping. go ice that thing. sorry. hand cramp. ahh. [ male announcer ] cyber monday is back. shop now for great savings with free shipping. the first and only place to go for cyber monday. walmart.com. no, no, no, stop! humans -- one day, we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the next... stop, stop, stop! my car! not so much. but that's okay. you're covered with great ideas like optional better car replacement from libert
of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, the advances have been largely reverse through a renewed and even more effective partnership. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling aqap, eliminating it as a threat will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. assistance, a close partnership with the yemeni government, yet many people, and steadfast support. another country we have made progress in recently is somalia. for years i became director of the cia. it was obvious somalia was a failed state, a failed state where the militant group al- shabaab controlled large pieces of territory, declared fealty to out-, brought about by humanitarian crisis and planned to -- declared fealty to al qaeda, and brought about humanitarian crisis. now there, too, we have seen progress in large part because of the african union mission in somalia. the result is al-shabaab that has lost more than 50% of the territory it held in 2010. since losing control of mogadishu in august of 2011, hundreds of al-shabaab fighters have surrendered to forces. these forces recently too
are looking at our pick city, portland oregon, news channel 8, looking for fog and daytime sunshine. a lot of wet weather in that neck of the woods. for today, clouds and no big problems. wet weather down through the gulf coast, severe weather later this evening. snow showers back through the northern plains and . >>> 8:05 on a back to work cyber monday. we are looking good here in sunol where the fog is burning off. we have thick pockets out there. the thickest fog is located on the peninsula from san mateo to santa rosa. less than .25 of a mile visibility. that fog will clear. we will see a nice sunny finish. temperatures in the mid-60s. 67 in livermore. 66 degrees in san francisco. rain moves in on wednesday. >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> all right, al. thanks. coming up next, from fashion to travel, to the hottest technology, we'll let you in on the biggest bargains this cyber monday right after this. ♪ ♪ the truth about mascara is... it clumps. introducing a revolutionary new mascara. clump crusher...crusher. 200% more volume. zero clumps. new clump crusher from
. >> it was incredible to see that as a kid. you can do such slave labor. >> reporter: willie now lives in salt lake city with a host family, pam and ron jensen. they quickly learned that willie can't read. >> you want me to write it down. i'll write it down. >> reporter: did you realize how little you knew? >> yes, i did. being in the religion, i knew i was going nowhere. i wasn't growing in life. i couldn't change because, i didn't know how to change. dog? >> that says dog. and then? >> dogs. >> good. >> i should have learned this when i was in first grade. >> you're doing good. >> reporter: according to willie, most children in the flds get no more than a grade school education. >> if they want you to get out of school, they'll paid for it. you're pretty well uneducated as far as anything goes. >> and willie is just one of thousands of children who are or have been under the thumb of warren jeffs. willie has six sisters who were able to recently break free, along with his mother. we follow them and their difficult journey out of this secret sect and look at the many who remain inside, josh. >> somethi
to get to sin city from southern california. debatch ri at its best. a tense standoff at the gaza israel border ending with one person dead and several injured. this is just days after that truce was put into place. we have details on that and take a look at the oil markets. oil up more than 1% today, really following the stock market higher, but 88 bucks plus a barrel. ♪ [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis sympto. but if you have arthritis, staying active cabe difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with ahritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benets with theisks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxe a
basically said if you are a small county in alabama or a city and you want to exchange your election laws or voting laws, you have to basically get it cleared ahead of time in washington and send some sort of form to the justice department to explain what you are going to do or you could go to a federal court. the theory was for 100 years, even though racial discrimination had been outlawed by the 15th amendment, a lot of cities and towns that control the voter rolls had various schemes that prevented blacks from registering to vote, so the federal government -- this is an unusual lot to say we are going to put the whole part of the country under special scrutiny of the federal courts -- that law still exists. the dissected by the voting rights act. it still is the case, if texas wants to change its congressional districts or have a new voter id laws. the networks -- a need to get it cleared from washington. host: how many states are we talking? guest: there are nine states, i think, covered by the law. the formula, i can tell you the simple part of it. it is the deep south. from there it
city. and there was a wonderful moment the night before the community opened when one of his lutenants was sitting around a table in arizona and he said how am i going to sell a 30 year mortgage to somebody who is 65-year-old. and they said we should have thought about that before. and they had sleepless nights and the next day 100,000 people came. and they managed to make what was seen as a necessity, a virtue. and this idea of the golden years became a hall mark of the american dream. it's not just retirement that was invented in the last century. even addlessens t idea of youth was concocted in the early part of the century. that word was coined by a 60-year-old. because we were at a situation in the country where there was a proliferation of the night nors of that day. i was talking earlier about night young nor old as the characteristic of so many of news our 50's, 60's, sevent. well there were these young people who weren't children or quite adults. there was a lot of disruption in the country. there was concern about these young people who had physician cal maturity but not emot
and 70 in redwood city. beautiful conditions continue into the first part of the weekend. >> and that's your weather. >>> imagine a place that's so silent, you can hear your heartbeating and your lungs filling with air. it might sound like science fiction, but it is actually a place here on earth, recognized by the folks at guinness as the quietest place on earth. gary sanders took a trip inside. >> reporter: in the chaos of our world where there's seemingly no escape from noise, petty officer third class nick hair wanted complete silence. for the last nine months, he bunked feet below the deck of the uss abraham lincoln. >> it is loud and noisy. it is like living under a roller coaster. >> reporter: at orfield labs in minneapolis, in a chamber the guinness book of world records says is the quietest place on earth, where you can literally hear a pin drop, this sailor asked for an escape. >> okay. get settled in. world's quietest room. cool. >> reporter: i endured the chamber for just five minutes. there's like intense pressure, like in a car driving up a mountain. keep having to swall
their buddies, but it didn't start there. it started in a small town or city or neighborhood like you know when a young person got the feeling that they ought to enter the service. sometimes it is because their father, grandfather, uncle, or brother served. sometimes they lost a loved one. sometimes it was just an idea they got. sometimes they get the complete support of their community and people made a big deal about them leaving. sometimes they do it over some of the protests and concerns of friends or family. sometimes they have tried college or work and it did not work out for them. they decided that they just needed to serve and they do that. once they join the military, it is a completely different life from anything you have done. no matter what the recruiter tell you, it is never like that. [laughter] you get there and immediately the service wants to make you a service member -- a soldier, sailor, airman, marine. they trust you differently. they have to learn a different language. they are trying to make you part of a team. it is no longer part of individual. it is all being part of t
he sent an emissary to buy bye-bye the city of new orleans from france. the louisiana territory as a whole was not mentioned by anyone in the united states is even a possibility. the emissary travel across the atlantic and lands in france in search traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there -- robert livingston's approach by talleyrand who is napoleon's foreign ministry and talleyrand comes to livingston says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory of louisiana? livingston, he's not exactly surprising that livingston said yes, let's do this. they complete the negotiations negotiations -- i'm sorry, james monroe. who would become madison secretary of state and with them become madison's successor as president? we have your in the room a bunch of people who were almost, who would be president or almost president so monroe completes the negotiations. they are not typical. the french really want to sell. sell. they have bigger problems with britain and they want the cash. >> host: louisiana they have
the tear -- territory from france. he sent him to buy the city of new orleans from france. the louisiana territory as a whole was not mentioned by anyone in the united states as even a possibility. that embasary arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to prot
investing dashboard. >> super storm sandy is gone. an unusual thanksgiving in the northeast. the city of new york is distributing almost 27,000 holiday meals in neighborhoods reeling from sandy. tonight, anna kooiman shows us how some members are giving like never before. >> i thank god and thank the people of rockaway. everybody came together and we'll pull through this. later, guys. >> take care. >> you always love family and in the storm, everybody became a family. >> and in the wake of superstorm zahn, enough turkey and fixings, to feed a thousand folks in need. in rockaway. >> we have one corn, open, two-- >> in the previous years, fed 600. >> and there's so much need and not enough dollars to go around. the church looks different than it has for the past 18 years, the basement was flooded, and they're running the thanksgiving operation using generator power. >> when you take rockaway and ocean side and bellmore and massapequa. >> there's massive devastation on horrendous levels. >> eric snow was in the dark over a week and had flooding from eight to ten foot storm surge and teac
institution that serves the inner-city section of york -- did away with rotc about 16 years after i graduated because of the vietnam war. they have decided to bring it back this year. [applause] >> i want to leave you with one story and one thought. i was in minnesota. they have the military appreciation fund. they collect money for rehab, college, and other things. it unifies the entire state. the speaker was a mother of a national guardsman who had gone three times to iraq. she is a big executive at the target corporation. she did not want to be involved with her son's activities. she went off to see him often. she was named the chair of the parents left behind. she took on the responsibility. look at the young mothers with their children who were crying because her daddy had gotten on the airplane. she thought she owed it to her son and her country into the sun people. -- and to these young people. she gave me the most haunting line i have never heard -- i quickly learned when you are a military mother, you go home and draw the lines on the window that looked out across the driveway. you c
in new york city. some 11,000 people huddled up outside waiting for the doors to open finally got. in the mall of american in minneapolis reports 30,000 folks showed up there for the mall's opening at midnight. that's up 10,000 from last year. things were a little different this time around in the sense that several major chains actually opened last evening it worked out pretty well for the folks who shopped at those locations this morning. >> we are in the in between crowd. the crazy people that come really early and then, you know, the people that sleep in. >> of course, there were also the scattered reports of violence and stupidity amid the crowds. [screaming] >> holy cow, this amateur video shows wal-mart shoppers in georgia pushing each other to get their hands on prepaid cell phones that were on sale. also in san antonio a guy pulled a gun on another man who was trying to cut in line at a mall. and police in springfield, massachusetts say a man there left his girlfriend's 2-year-old sonnen in the parking lot of a k-mart while he drove away with a brand new tv. we have team
. such a pleasure to see you all year at what is absolutely one of my favorite advance in the city every year, the boss and books festival. i am co-host of radio boston. [applause] >> thank you very much. if you don't listen to this show i'm going to give a shameless plug. 3:00 p.m. monday through friday and, of course, very proud to be a presenting partner for boston but festival because this spirit that brings literally tens of thousands of us together on a day like this inquiry investigation exploration, love of learning and literature, it is a natural combination for the city of boston, boston but festival, and w. b. you are. i'm honored and proud to be here, especially for this panel. and before i introduce the three amazing women who are sitting to my right, a couple of quick reminders. one is that cell phones, if you have already been given that reminder, please turn them off. at the very, very least, silent. since we are in the smart file generation, i also ask you to -- i urge you to resist the urge to tweet were facebook or look stuff up during this panel. let's try and create a sac
. prevent acid all day and all night for 24 hours with prevacid24hr. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. >>> because i'm tired of working for a company where workers get cheated and cheaters get rewarded. >> because i want a better life for my son. >> because my management suspects me in front of customers. >> stand up, live better. >> those some of the walmart workers associated with our walmart. but before there was our walmart, city councils across the country have gone up against the big box giant to keep its low prices and even lower wages out of their communities. from massachusetts to illinois, to california, americans have said no to walmart opening doors in their neighbor
was awarded to general george washington in 1776 for liberating the city of boston. today, we will present a congressional gold medal to aung san suu kyi in recognition of her efforts to liberate the people of burma. today, we celebrate her steadfast commitment to democracy, stability, and human dignity, and we do so in a manner worthy of her ideals. nancy pelosi initiated the measure of awarding this metal and republican george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by th
a voter registration card. it looked strange to me. it was stamped from the city of philadelphia. the address said south spruce street. i know it runs east to west. it also had a wrong the number address. the street only goes to 250 and it went to 261. host: what is the process there? caller: i have no idea. i called city hall. they had no name of that voter. i tell the voters he was not allowed to vote of my polling system. he then threatened me and said he would come after me. he had people waiting outside of the before me. it was a very frightening situation. fortunately, a voter who was there with me came to my defense. i called city hall and they said, we would never issue anything like that. there was an official stamp. i also called the district attorney's office. they never called me back. i called and called again. this is our right fraud. if you just had a voter i.d.. the lines are enormous. i have to check the spelling of their name, i have to look up everything. it is so much easier and nicer for us as a worker. i was there for 14 hours that day with a half hour lunch
might remember bernie, the new york city police commissioner nominated by president bush to be part of his department of all land -- homeland security. they didn't vett him carefully because later he pleaded tuilty to -- guilty to fraud. or the designation as secretary of labor that had to be withdrawn the next week because a woman gave her some money and it may or may not have been illegal. but she had misled the vetters, and they threw her under the bus. after the governor romney campaign, there may be a new set of questions. it is a difficult thing if you are nominated to a prestigious post as an officer of the united states. the most important part happens in the senate. for instance, bill clinton wanted to support -- appoint robert reich. robert founded intimidating to be at hearings in front of the senate. he wrote a book called lost in the cabinet. these are sometimes known as murder boards. you can see why it is called that. he is explaining in his book, the preparation and his aides helping him get to the nomination process and practicing with him. i am planning for a confi
engagement overall, cities that are perfectly capable if they are empowered or have resources to solve their own problems. i would rather have that happen. >> barbara and that ayanna pressley gets the last word. >> interesting thing to remember. race to the top started with george bush and was advanced by obama. we are doing things at the national level to reduce the education disparity. obamacare started with mitt romney. it was romneycare before and giving access to health insurance is one of the most important things we consume in this nation to level the disparities in health and the disparities created by lack of access to health insurance. so we have bipartisan support for two of the most important things that are going to level us. the things we don't do is think about where do we help the most people the fastest, thinking about per capita returns on investment and our biggest weakness as a nation is community colleges, it skill gaps that we have left open. left wide open between the industries we are holding on to as we compete globally and how well we have done educating the p
-oriented city encircled by soviet-leaning east germany. and so president kennedy was afraid throughout the cuban missile crisis that if they just invaded, that would be over in a certain amount of time. but then the soviets could very easily dot same to berlin. they could just take over berlin without much difficulty. and that would lead, if the west chose, which it probably would have, to a nuclear exchange. so the sequence of likely events in president kennedy's thinking was if cuba fell easily, which we now know it would not have, then the soviets would have taken berlin, which would have led to a conflagration in europe and really the end of the world. >> i want to go back. right around this time there was the civil rights issue at the university of mississippi, and we've got a couple of tapes, one from september 30 of 162 and one from september 22. the first one obviously 292nd with ross barnett. who is he? >> he's governor the mississippi. he's in a tight spot because he's fanned the flames of segregation, thinking he's an ardent segregationist. his political base was based on that. but th
have no power, and more than two million are without water. in the coastal city of sendai, a city of a million people-- about the size of detroit-- we saw nearly 3,000 residents patiently waiting for a grocery store to open for the first time in days. there are shortages of food, and lines for gasoline stretch half a mile. add to all of this what you might call nuclear refugees. thousands are in shelters because their homes are too close to the fukushima reactors. not only are their homes in danger of being irradiated but every possession they own. yoshihiko igarashi's house is three miles from the plant. his daughter was born there. she turned 20 last week in the shelter. like everyone, they've laid out a few square feet on the floor with no idea how long they'll be here. 1,600 people are in this shelter alone. it's just 20 miles from where the reactor fires are burning. if you believe u.s. experts, that's much too close. >> [speaking japanese] >> igarashi told us he feels that way too. the japanese are, for the moment, balancing between the disaster that has happened and the dis
destabilized last year, aq ap took control of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, their advances have been largely reversed through a renewed and even more effective partnership with yemen's new government. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling them, eliminating it as a threat to the united states will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. training and assistance, close partnership with the government and people of yemen and political support for transition. another country we have made good progress is somalia. for years -- when i became director of the c.i.a., it was obvious that somalia was a failed state. the failed state where the militant group controlled large pieces of territory. declared allegiance to al qaeda and brought about a humanitarian crisis and planned attacks in the region. but there, too, we have seen significant progress. in large part because of an effective partnership between the united states and the african union mission in somalia. the result of these efforts is an al shabaab that has lost 50% of the territory it hel
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